Fjords

Fjords

Deep, new valleys were formed from thousands of metres of land ice as it made its way towards the sea, and the land was scraped, scrubbed and scoured by the glaciers.
Geiranger og de syv søstre.

Norway's beatiful fjords

Deep, new valleys were formed from thousands of metres of land ice as it made its way towards the sea, and the land was scraped, scrubbed and scoured by the glaciers. As sea levels rose, these valleys filled with water creating the fjords of today. Hundreds of metres deep, surrounded by steep mountain sides with mountains that are over a thousand metres high.

Norway has many fjords – and long fjords. The world's second longest fjord, Sognefjord, is over 20 kilometres long and 1,308 metres deep. The Norwegian word fjord means "where you cross" and has crossed over into many other languages including English.

Geiranger. Photo: Visitnorway.com

Geiranger Fjord

Along the fjords, people have clung to steep slopes or mountain ledges as in the Geiranger Fjord. The mountainous landscape of Geiranger is on UNESCO's World Heritage List. On Havila Voyages, you can sail through this cultural landscape that tells us about people's ability to make a living almost no matter how steep it is around them. 

It was warm on the sunny slopes, and it was even possible to grow heat-loving plants such as tomatoes and apricots here. There were salmon in the fjord, and further inland there was room for sheep and goats. Parents had to resign themselves to tying very young children with ropes when they were playing to ensure that they did not fall off the cliff.

In summer and autumn, the trip to Geiranger departs from Ålesund on the northbound voyage.

Trollfjorden (The Trollfjord)

Trollfjord is another spectacular fjord you visit with Havila Voyages. At its narrowest, the fjord is only a hundred metres wide and the mountain walls shoot over a thousand metres up from the sea so close to the side of the ship that it almost feels like you can touch them. The northern wall is smooth-polished monzonite, the oldest rock type in Norway.

Inside, the fjord widens so that the ship can turn around and sail out again. You can think about the great battle that took place in the fjord in 1890. The fjord was full of fish. The large steamboats closed off the fjord and locked in the wealth, while the fishermen in the smaller boats were locked out. It ended with a battle that has entered into both Norwegian literature and art. And then the battle cry rang out between the steep mountainsides without fear of waking the trolls who gave the fjord its name...

The Trollfjord flows into the Raftesundet Strait on the voyage between Svolvær and Stokmarknes. Visits to the Trollfjord may be cancelled in bad weather if there is a risk of avalanches or similar.

Havila ship sailing through narrow fjord with steep stony sides and some green vegetation.

Travel to the fjords

North- and southboundRound Voyage

Bergen → Kirkenes → Bergen

Havila ship sailing in the azure blue Geiranger fjord with steep green sides and a partly cloudy sky.
The Classic

NorthboundVoyage North

Bergen → Kirkenes

Atlantic Ocean road connected by bridges on small islands.
7 days

NorthboundThe Magical Fjords of Norway

Bergen → Trondheim

Geiranger og de syv søstre.
3 days